BLACK HISTORY MONTH QUIZ

  1. Historian Carter G. Woodson chose February as the month to honor black history because:
  •        Woodson was born in February.
  •        Abraham Lincoln and Frederick Douglass were born in Feb.
  •        February was the shortest month.
  •        All of the above.
  1. True or False, Black History Month is only celebrated in the United States.
  •        True
  •        False
  1. The first Black History Month celebration in the U.S. took place when?
  •        1945
  •        1957
  •        1970
  •        2000
  1. This former slave became a famous abolitionist and a Methodist preacher.
  •         Sojourner Truth
  •         Harriett Tubman
  •         Harriett Beecher Stowe
  •         David Walker
  1. Which United Methodist church is named after one of the “founding fathers of Gospel music?”
  •         Tindley Temple
  •         Jones Memorial United Methodist Church
  •         Barratt’s Chapel
  •         Seay-Hubbard United Methodist Church
  1. This former school, once a haven from racial prejudice, is now an UMCOR relief center:
  •        Scarritt Bennet Center, Nashville, Tennessee
  •        Southern Methodist University, Dallas, Texas
  •        Sager-Brown Depot in Baldwin, Louisiana
  •        The New Room, Bristol, England
  1. After the U.S. Civil War, this trailblazing African American woman went to college, owned a business, and became a Methodist missionary.
  •        Susanna Wesley
  •        Susan Angeline Collins
  •        Billie Holiday
  •        Bishop Sharma Lewis
  1. Mother African Zoar United Methodist Church in Philadelphia housed…
  •        The first well-baby clinic for African Americans
  •        A stop on the Underground Railroad
  •        A school
  •        All of the above.
  1. Who was the first African American bishop in the UMC?
  •        Roy G. Biv
  •        Roy C. Nichols
  •        Roy Rogers
  •        Roy Brown
  1. Who was the only woman besides Coretta Scott King on the platform when MLK gave his “I Have a Dream” speech in 1963?
  •        Jacquelyn Kennedy
  •        Lena Horne
  •        Mahalia Jackson
  •        Dorothy Height

 

Thank you for taking the quiz. Here are the answers to check yourself!
 

1. Historian Carter G. Woodson chose February as the month to honor black history because:

Woodson chose February as the month to honor black history because Abraham Lincoln and Frederick Douglass were born in February.

 

2. True or False, Black History Month is only celebrated in the United States.

The correct answer is False. Black History Month, also known as African American History Month, is an annual observance in Canada, Ireland, the Netherlands, the United Kingdom, and the United States.

 

3. The first Black History Month celebration in the U.S. took place when?

The correct answer is 1970. Black educators and members of Black United Students at Kent State University organized the first month-long event. In 1976, President Gerald Ford recognized Black History Month during the U.S. Bicentennial celebration. He urged Americans to “seize the opportunity to honor the too-often neglected accomplishments of black Americans in every area of endeavor throughout our history”.

 
4. This former slave became a famous abolitionist and a Methodist preacher.
 

The correct answer is Sojourner Truth. Born a slave named Isabella Baumfree, she changed her name to Sojourner Truth after New York abolished slavery and she co-founded Kingston Methodist Church. In 1843, Truth began to travel and preach and was heavily involved in the abolitionist movement. In her public speeches, she spoke of her religious faith along with her experiences as a slave.

5. Which United Methodist church is named after one of the “founding fathers of Gospel music?”

 

The correct answer is Tindley Temple, located in Philadelphia. Charles Albert Tindley was a clergyman of the Methodist Episcopal Church and a founding figure in American Gospel music. Born in Berlin, Maryland in 1851, he died as pastor of a 12,500 member congregation in Philadelphia. He also wrote the words and music to dozens of Gospel hymns, including five published in the current United Methodist Hymnal and others found in the Songs of Zion songbook.
 
6. This former school, once a haven from racial prejudice, is now an UMCOR relief Center
 
The correct answer is Sager-Brown Depot in Baldwin, Louisiana. Started in 1867, Sager Brown provided housing and education for black orphans of the U.S. Civil War. When the program was in financial straits in the early 1900s, Mrs. Addie Sager and Mrs. C. W. Brown purchased the school and gave it to the Woman’s Home Mission Society to operate. The school closed in 1978 but became a disaster center in 1992 after Hurricane Andrew devastated the nearby area. Since then United Methodist volunteers by the thousands have come to the site to pack relief kits for those in need.
 

7. After the U.S. Civil War, this trailblazing African American woman went to college, owned a business, and became a Methodist missionary.

The correct answer is Susan Angeline Collins. Born in Illinois in 1851, the daughter of an indentured servant, she was the first African American student to attend Upper Iowa University. Collins worked in the home of a Methodist pastor in Iowa and went on to own a laundry business in Huron, Dakota. She later sold the laundry to follow a call to serve in the mission field. In 1887, at the age of 36, she went to Angola and served 13 years with no pay. She established a boarding school in Angola.
 
8. Mother African Zoar United Methodist Church in Philadelphia housed…
 

The correct answer is all of the above. Mother Zoar UMC served African Americans in Philadelphia as a stop on the Underground Railroad; the first well-baby clinic for African Americans; a school; and a source of credit for home loans.

9. Who was the first African American bishop in the UMC?

The correct answer is Roy Nichols was the first African American bishop in The United Methodist Church. He was elected a bishop at the Northeastern Jurisdictional Conference in July 1968 and assigned to the Pittsburgh Area where he served for 12 years. He then served the New York Area until his retirement in 1984. As clergy, he served in Berkeley at one of the first integrated churches and he hosted a radio show called “The Christian Answer.”  In 1964 Nichols became the pastor of the 4,600-member Salem United Methodist Church in Harlem and helped build a community center. Nichols was chair of the development committee at Africa University after his retirement. He died on Oct. 9, 2002.
 
10. Who was the only woman besides Coretta Scott King on the platform when MLK gave his “I Have a Dream” speech in 1963?
 

The correct answer is Dorothy Height was the only woman, besides Coretta Scott King, on the platform with Rev. Martin Luther King when he gave his “Dream” speech in 1963. She was also on the platform when the first African American president of the U.S., Barack Obama, was sworn in 45 years later. As president of the National Council of Negro Women, Height helped organize voter registration in the South, voter education in the North and scholarship programs for student civil rights workers. Known as the “Godmother of the Civil Rights Movement” Height’s advocacy helped pass the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Voting Rights Act of 1965.

 
 
 
 

·         Ranking: 8 – 10 correct:    

 

Ultimate understanding

                          4 –   7 correct:

 

Moving toward perfection. Just a few misses!

                          0 –   3 correct:

 

Could use more study on the subject

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FAMOUS BLACK METHODISTS
 
As early as 1758, John Wesley himself baptized the first African American converts. The Methodist church was staunchly against slavery and allowed slaves to worship even without their masters in the Methodist church.
 

Although Daniel “Chappie” James Jr. (1920-1978) was not a Methodist, he was perhaps the most famous African American to come out of Pensacola. So we will include him on our list. He was a highly decorated pilot with the Air Force and the first African American to become a 4 star General in any of the military branches. He was also one of the famous Tuskegee Airmen. One of his sons later became an Air Force General as well.

Harry Hosier (1750-1806) worked with Frances Asbury as a circuit rider

James Varick (1750-1827) worked with groups to petition for right to vote

Richard Allen (1760-1831) started the AME church

Joshua Johnson  (1763-1824) was the first  African American portrait painter to become famous in US

Rev. Josiah Henson (1796-1883)  His life was commemorated by the Uncle Tom’s Cabin Historical Site

Sojourner Truth (1797-1883) was born a slave named Isabella Baumfree, she changed her name after New York abolished slavery and she co-founded Kingston Methodist Church.

John W. E. Brown (1800-1859) was a famous Abolitionist

Daniel Payne (1811-1893) was the first African American president of a college in US in 1863

Fredrick Douglas  (1818-1895) was an abolitionists during Civil War

Harriet Tubman (Arminta Ross) (1822-1913) freed slaves through the Underground Railroad

Mathew Brady (1822-1901)was the first African American Senator  (Republican from Mississippi)

Pierre Caliste Landry (1841-1884)  in 1868 was the first African American US Mayor (Louisiana)

Juliann Jane Tillman in 1844 became the first female African American preacher in AME

Charles Albert Tindley  (1851-1933) one of the pioneers of Gospel Music

Edward Bouchet (1852-1918) was a physicist and was the first African American person to get PhD in the US

George Washington Carver (1864-1943) was a prolific and famous inventor

Justice Thurgood Marshall (1908-1993) was the first African American person on the Supreme Court (1967-1991)

Janet Matilda Bolin (1908-2007) became the first African American woman judge in 1939

Rosa Parks  (1913-2005) was an activist for the Civil Rights Movement

Dr. Olivia J. Hooker (1915-2018) became the first African American female in the Coast Guard in 1945

Jack Roosevelt Robinson (Jackie Robinson) (1919-1972) was the first African American professional Baseball player

James Farmer (1920-1999) was an activist for the Civil Rights Movement

Jocelyn Elders (born 1933) was appointed in 1993 as the first African American Surgeon General in the US

Ellen Johnson Sirleaf,  (born 1938) was President of Liberia (2006-2018) and the first female head of state in Africa

Singers: Toni Braxton, Roberta Flack, Dionne Warwick & Beyonce
 
for information on other historical/modern African American Methodist check this out:
 
pinterest.com/rexi44/black-history-methodist/?autologin=true
 

BLACK HISTORY MONTH INVENTORS

Here is a list of 11 inventors who changed our everyday lives. All of them are African Americans (religious preferences unknown).

George Washington Carver (1864-1943) was an inventor, chemist and botanist. When other colleges would not admit him due to his race, he enrolled in Simpson College which was a Methodist College. He was the first African American to receive a Bachelor of Science degree. He was born a slave. He invented over 300 ways to use peanuts, and 100s of ways to use sweet potatoes, pecans and soy beans. He developed crop rotation to prevent soil depletion. Also dyes, stains, writing inks, paints, soap, shaving cream, lotions, healing oils for Tuberculosis, lemon drops and especially Peanut Butter. He co-founded the Tuskegee Institute.
 
Lewis Latimer in 1881 improved Thomas Edison’s light bulb that only burned for a few days with a carbon light bulb filament that allowed the bulbs to work for a much longer period of time. Later he went to work for Edison. He also contributed to the invention of the telephone.
 
Sarah Goode was the first black woman to get a patent in 1885. She invented the folding cabinet bed for people who live in small spaces. I guess you could say-the original Murphy bed!
 
Alexander Miles invented automatic elevator doors in 1887 and is in the National Inventor’s Hall of Fame. His father was a Deacon in the Methodist Church.
 
Garrett Morgan in 1923 invented the 3 light traffic light and added the yellow yield light. He only had an elementary school education and was the son of a slave. He also improved the sewing machine and invented many other things like the gas mask and was the first black person in Cleveland Ohio to own a car.
 
Frederick McKinley Jones in 1940 invented the refrigerated truck and held over 60 patents. He also co-founded Thermal King. The refrigerated truck was critical to winning the WWII. He was a National Medal of Technology awardee and is in the National Inventor’s Hall of Fame.
 
Dr. James West invented the electret microphone in 1964. They were used in hearing aids, tape recorders, telephones and baby monitors. He holds over 250 patents.
 

Marie Van Brittan Brown (a nurse) in 1966 invented her own closed circuit security system that she could operate from her bedroom. It had cameras in peepholes, a monitor in the house, a microphone at the door and buttons to unlock the door and call the police. Patented in 1969. Sounds like Ring!

Shirley Ann Jackson in 1970 invented Caller ID & Call Waiting. She attended a Methodist College in Texas. She was the first black woman to get a doctorate (Nuclear Physics) from MIT. She was a National Medal of Science awardee. She did postdoctoral research of subatomic particles in the 1970s. Dr. Jackson conducted breakthrough basic scientific research that enabled others to invent the portable fax, touch tone telephone, solar cells and fiber optic cables.
 

Patricia Bath was the first black person to complete a residency in ophthalmology and the first black female doctor to get a medical patent in 1986. She pioneered cataract laser surgery and invented medical equipment. She was a member of the Methodist Church where they held her funeral.

Otis Boykin held 27 patents on electrical devices, but is best known for inventing electronic control devises for guided missiles, IBM computers and the pacemaker.